Wilsonville Heritage Tree Program

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Three Sisters Oaks (Quercus garryana) on private property on SW Kinsman Road at SW Gaylord Way.


In 2004, when City Councilor Charlotte Lehan served as Mayor, the City's Heritage Tree Program was established to recognize trees that have historical significance or were planted by (or in honor of) someone who advanced the interest of trees and plants in the community. Trees can also be recognized for a significant role in landscape architecture, forestry, city planning, and culture.

The first tree designated, in 2004, was the Ernest Kolbe Giant Sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum). Planted by long-time Wilsonville resident and forestry expert Ernest Kolbe (1903-1978), this tree is located next to his former homestead on the east side of Memorial Park.

The most recent designation, in 2017, is the Three Sisters Oaks. From 160 to 210 years old, these three Oregon white oaks (Quercus garryana) stand tall and proud in a stately row on private property on SW Kinsman Road at SW Gaylord Way.

You can learn all about Wilsonville's Heritage Trees and some local history by viewing the virtual tour. Just follow this link and enjoy!

Wilsonville has thousands of trees, but only 10 trees or groves are recognized City Heritage Trees. Between 2004 and 2009, nine trees or groves were designated, but only one small grove has been added since. To bring new life to the Heritage Tree Program in 2020, the City has rolled out a new logo and launched this page on Let’s Talk, Wilsonville! The City is now actively seeking nominations of trees of special significance that tell a story of local history or provide a connection to the community’s heritage.

If you think a tree or grove would be a good candidate for Heritage Tree designation, the City welcomes nominations. To nominate a tree or learn more, follow this link.


In 2004, when City Councilor Charlotte Lehan served as Mayor, the City's Heritage Tree Program was established to recognize trees that have historical significance or were planted by (or in honor of) someone who advanced the interest of trees and plants in the community. Trees can also be recognized for a significant role in landscape architecture, forestry, city planning, and culture.

The first tree designated, in 2004, was the Ernest Kolbe Giant Sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum). Planted by long-time Wilsonville resident and forestry expert Ernest Kolbe (1903-1978), this tree is located next to his former homestead on the east side of Memorial Park.

The most recent designation, in 2017, is the Three Sisters Oaks. From 160 to 210 years old, these three Oregon white oaks (Quercus garryana) stand tall and proud in a stately row on private property on SW Kinsman Road at SW Gaylord Way.

You can learn all about Wilsonville's Heritage Trees and some local history by viewing the virtual tour. Just follow this link and enjoy!

Wilsonville has thousands of trees, but only 10 trees or groves are recognized City Heritage Trees. Between 2004 and 2009, nine trees or groves were designated, but only one small grove has been added since. To bring new life to the Heritage Tree Program in 2020, the City has rolled out a new logo and launched this page on Let’s Talk, Wilsonville! The City is now actively seeking nominations of trees of special significance that tell a story of local history or provide a connection to the community’s heritage.

If you think a tree or grove would be a good candidate for Heritage Tree designation, the City welcomes nominations. To nominate a tree or learn more, follow this link.

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Nominate a Tree or Grove

4 months

Do you think a tree or grove would be a good candidate for Heritage Tree designation? Drop a pin on the map to show where it lives!

Tell a bit about its history or significance to the community, and your connection with it. Upload images - old or new - of the tree or grove and notable community members connected with it. 

There is also a form at this link that you can use to nominate the tree or grove for Heritage Tree designation.

Thank you for helping build the City's Heritage Tree Program!

Do you think a tree or grove would be a good candidate for Heritage Tree designation? Drop a pin on the map to show where it lives!

Tell a bit about its history or significance to the community, and your connection with it. Upload images - old or new - of the tree or grove and notable community members connected with it. 

There is also a form at this link that you can use to nominate the tree or grove for Heritage Tree designation.

Thank you for helping build the City's Heritage Tree Program!