Stumped? Ask the City!

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Do you have a question about Wilsonville that nobody has adequately answered for you?

If you're left wondering, others may be too. Ask us! We'll try to track down an answer. We're looking for queries, not policy questions. For example:

  • Who was Wilsonville named for?
  • How did Charbonneau become part of Wilsonville?
  • Is there a frog pond in Frog Pond?

You get the idea! Ask your question below.

Do you have a question about Wilsonville that nobody has adequately answered for you?

If you're left wondering, others may be too. Ask us! We'll try to track down an answer. We're looking for queries, not policy questions. For example:

  • Who was Wilsonville named for?
  • How did Charbonneau become part of Wilsonville?
  • Is there a frog pond in Frog Pond?

You get the idea! Ask your question below.

Q&A

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    A follow up on my question regarding blowing leaves into the street...So its not a violation of city codes? So the city does not fine or prevent home owners from blowing all their leaves into the street? The city simply discourages it? I'm asking because if there is no violation then as an HOA we have no basis to stop this practice other then environmental issues as you state in your response. Is this correct?

    emrusso asked 16 days ago

    Nov. 13, 2020: Per City Code, blowing leaves into the street (8.314(1)) IS a violation. Enforcement may include stop work orders, termination of permits, civil penalties, or City abatement and an assessment of costs.

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    Can we blow our leaves into the street? As an HOA member I'm asking so I may educate our community.

    emrusso asked 17 days ago

    Nov. 12, 2020: No, please don't. Raking or blowing fall leaves, grass clippings or any other yard debris onto streets should be avoided, because these items cannot be removed effectively by street sweepers. The accumulation of leaves on streets also endangers motorists and bike riders, whose tires may slip on wet leaves. Leaves and other yard debris may harm waterways, or cause flooding and can starve fish by depleting oxygen as they decay. The annual Leaf Drop-Off Day is this Saturday, Nov. 14, at City Hall. 


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    There is a definite need to repaint the "guide striping" when crossing northbound across Wilsonville Road out of the Main Street area (northbound Town Center Loop West). I was subject to severe road rage incident this evening because it's not clear at all which lane to turn into westbound on Wilsonville Road!! Long overdue for "maintenance striping"!!!

    Beachblu asked 6 months ago

    June 4, 2020: Thanks for bringing your recent experience to our attention. I checked in with Public Works, they are aware, and had already requested that Clackamas County complete this re-striping activity while working in the Wilsonville area. I have no time frame, unfortunately, but your query is giving them an opportunity to check in and reiterate our need to move this up the priority list.

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    Is there a plan for the empty building next to the starbucks at 30299 SW Boones Ferry Rd Unit 102 Wilsonville, OR 97070? Is there a way for people to suggest what business should utilize that space or for people to contact business to inquire if they would start a new location there? For example, I think it would be great if we could get a Trader Joe’s to open in that area.

    Cleverusername asked 7 months ago

    May 13, 2020: Alas, the space is not available. A former Albertsons grocery, the space remains under lease to Albertsons Companies, Inc., thru 2028.  The company opted to close the store, but continue payments, after purchasing the Safeway location in Wilsonville Town Center. 

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    With children out of school and more people working from home, the need for adequate Broadband services to homes has become a necessity. However, many homes do not have adequate Broadband in their homes to support the additional use the COVID-19 virus has caused. Is Wilsonville looking at the Broadband needs of our communities for now and the future? If so, how do I get involved to help support this need?

    aaronwoo1 asked 8 months ago

    Thanks for the question, Aaron.  We've identified a few resources that may be help in-need families get broadband access.  

    The FCC's Keep Americans Connected pledge is to keep Americans connected to internet service during the pandemic.  Participating companies -- including Comcast and Frontier --  are waiving late fees, postponing disconnects and creating Wi-Fi hotspots for free Internet usage. 

    For residents seeking new residential service, the Internet Essentials service, from Comcast, provides low cost service to eligible households.  New customers may receive two months of free service in response to the Coronavirus emergency.

    Additionally, Oregon Lifeline reduces the monthly cost of phone or broadband service for qualifying low-income Oregon households. Those who qualify are eligible to receive free or reduced-rate services.

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    What EMS Ambulance Service is available in Wilsonville and the surrounding area?

    Rocky asked 9 months ago

    Hi Rocky, I'm told that American Medical Response (AMR) provides emergency medical services in Wilsonville. Additionallly, Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue operates a medical unit. 

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    This question is for Wastewater Treatment - What to do about greasy, oily food residue in jars and bottles? There is a conflict brewing about recycling food containers. In order to prevent a greasy blob from forming in city pipes to the treatment plant, should citizens not wash out salad dressing, marinara jars or other containers that are greasy after use? In order to recycle these type of containers, Metro wants them washed and clean for recycling. I wash these empty containers with a dish soap that has a "strong" degreaser. I have been told I should throw away these greasy, oily containers because by washing them I am sending grease into the city pipes and to the grease blob. What is the correct answer to this Catch 22 question? Any clarification would be appreciated. Thank you for looking into this mystery.

    DagneSunrise asked 12 months ago

    Dec. 20, 2019: A great question, Dagne. Yes, you are correct that grease or oils should not be poured down sinks (or into toilets). Hot cooking oil should be placed in a metal can to cool and solidify, then placed in the garbage. As for preparing those glass containers for recycling, our in-house expert suggests substantially draining the contents into a bag or onto a paper towel to be disposed. At that point, you may safely rinse any trace amounts of residual oil or grease in the sink.

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    Are there any 55 or over communities in Wilsonville

    Rea asked 12 months ago

    Dec. 20, 2019: Yes, Rea, there are three independent living communities in Wilsonville for adults over the age of 55. Creekside Woods (7825 SW Wilsonville Rd.) and Wiedemann Park (29940 SW Brown Rd.) target renters over the age of 62, subject to eligibility; income limits do apply. Portera at the Grove (8945 SW Ash Meadows Cir.) targets people over 55, with no income limits. Additionally, the city has four assisted living communities: The Marquis, SpringRidge at Charbonneau, The Springs and Brookdale.


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    I have a concern as to how the cities crosswalks are engaged. That allow walkers to walk across at the same time cars are turning right , which requires the driver to stop until they come across. Why not allow the pedestrians to walk first 25-30 seconds, then engage the green light for cars. This would help traffic flow during peak time and make it safer for the public to cross without getting hit by cars looking left then all of a sudden there is a person right in front of you. You know that’s happen to you —

    Darius asked about 1 year ago

    Oct. 28, 2019: In consideration of your suggestion, Darius, our engineers offered their perspective: 

    "We are always looking for ways to improve traffic flow and safety.  In the scenario described, keep in mind that the right turn and thru vehicle movements share the same lane and signal condition.  Because of this shared movement, allowing pedestrians to cross in advance of a green vehicle signal would require all intersection vehicle movements be at a stop condition, meaning no traffic flow while pedestrians are crossing in the advance phase.  Unfortunately, this would lead to added delay, instead of improving traffic flow during peak time.

    Another consideration is that when a vehicle is waiting to turn right at a red light, typically the driver is looking to the left at oncoming traffic, waiting for a break in traffic to turn.  When the light is green, the right turning vehicle is looking straight ahead, and better able to spot pedestrians crossing the roadway.  Allowing pedestrians to cross in advance of the green light could potentially cause a less safe condition, as the right turning driver is more likely to be looking away from the pedestrian at a red light than at a green.  Let us know if further discussion is needed."

    Keep the ideas coming! Thanks for submitting your question. 

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    What is the status of the Boeckman Road 'Dip' Bridge project?

    aaronwoo1 asked about 1 year ago

    Oct. 25, 2019: According to our engineering department, a bridge alternatives study is currently underway to identify traffic impacts and construction costs associated with different bridge alignments and construction methods. This information will inform the design of the bridge before the project begins; the project is scheduled to start in early 2020.